Pages - Menu

Rules for Flag Hoisting in India on Republic Day-Republic Day Parade-Republic Day Celebrations

Rules for Flag Hoisting in India on Republic Day

"A flag is a necessity for all nations. Millions have died for it. It is no doubt a kind of idolatry which would be a sin to destroy. For, a flag represents an Ideal The unfurling of the Union Jack evokes in the English breast sentiments whose strength it is difficult to measure. The Stars and Stripes mean a world to the Americans. The Star and the Crescent will call forth the best bravery in Islam."

"It will be necessary for us Indians Muslims, Christians Jews, Parsis, and all others to whom India is their home-to recognize a common flag to live and to die for."

                                                                                                                           ~ Mahatma Gandhi
The Indian Flag is a national symbol and it is respected by every citizen of India.
There are certain points to remember while hoisting the Indian Flag.

The Indian Flag should be hoisted with the saffron colour on the top.
There should be no flag or emblem either above the National Flag or on its right.
If there are multiple flags to be hoisted, they must be placed to the left of the Indian Flag.
During the hoisting of the National Flag, all present must stand to give respect and honour its glory.
The flag cannot be intentionally allowed to touch the ground or the floor or trail in water. It cannot be draped over the hood, top, and sides or back of vehicles, trains, boats or aircraft.
The flag cannot be used for communal gains, drapery, or clothes.

The National Flag should be flown from sunrise to sunset, irrespective of the weather. It must be taken out before sunset.

Republic Day Parade


The main celebrations of Republic Day are held in the form of a colourful parade near India Gate in Delhi. The parade showcasing India's military might and cultural diversity covers a 8 km route, starting from the Rashtrapati Bhavan through the picturesque Rajpath down to India Gate before winding up at the historic Red Fort in Old Delhi.

The events of the day begin with the Prime Minister laying a wreath at the Amar Jawan Jyoti - India Gate. He then drives up to the central enclosure and awaits the arrival of the President and a Chief Guest of the occasion who is normally a Head of other Country.

On his arrival the Hon’ble President meets the dignitaries present and unfurls the National Flag. Following this the National Anthem is played with a 21-gun salute to the National Flag. After this a brief investiture ceremony takes place during which the President presents India's top gallantry awards, the Param Veer Chakra, the Veer Chakra and the Maha Veer Chakra to the outstanding soldiers from the defense services.

After this, four helicopters from the armed forces fly past the parade area showering rose petals on the audience. Each chopper carries a flag - the first being the Indian flag and the other three the flags of the Army, the Navy, and the Indian Air Force.

The march past begins immediately after the fly past. The President, as Commander-in-Chief of the Armed Forces, takes the salute of the mechanised, mounted and marching contingents of the Army, Air Force, Navy, Paramilitary forces, Police and the National Cadet Corps.

After the march past comes the cultural extravaganza consisting of floats presented by the various states and performances by school children. After the floats, the bravery awards winning children from all over the country enter on elephants.

A spectacular fly-past by Air Force and Naval aircraft rounds off this not-to-be missed experience. The parade is followed by a pageant of spectacular displays from the different states of the country. These moving exhibits depict scenes of activities of people in those states and the music and songs of that particular state accompany each display. Each display brings out the diversity and richness of the culture of India and the whole show lends a festive air to the occasion.

No other country in the world can parade so many ethnically different people in splendid uniforms as India's Armed Forces. But they are all united in their proven loyalty to the Government elected by the people and in their proud traditions and legendary gallantry.

Republic Day Celebrations

The Prime Minister lays a floral wreath at the Amar Jawan Jyoti early in the morning to honor the soldiers who sacrificed their lives for the nation. A two minute silence is observed in their memory and the Prime Minister moves ahead to the main dais at Rajpath. The President joins him/her there along with the Chief Guest and other dignitaries. The Chief Guest is usually the Head of State or Government from a foreign nation. The President hoists the flag and soon, the National Anthem is played. This is followed by a 21 gun salute.

The parade starts off with the Armed Forces regiments walking past the President. All the three regiments, that is, the Army, the Navy and the Air Force dress in their best official uniforms and march past finely. The Commander-in-Chief of the Indian Armed Forces, that is, the President takes the salute as the regiment pass by. The parade also includes people from the armed forces and civilians who have shown exceptional courage and distinguished themselves in various acts of heroism in different situations. The military parade is then followed with a vibrant and colorful parade of regional tableaus.

Cultural and folk dances also form the part of the parade where school children sing and dance to patriotic songs. The parade ends by jets and fighter planes flying past the parade symbolically saluting the President. The parade is telecasted live on the national television, allowing the entire nation to view it. Lastly, the crowd stands up as the National Anthem is played. However, this is not the end of the Republic Day celebrations. It is, in fact, a three-day extravaganza, where on the 27th January, the creme of the NCC cadets hold a Prime Minister's rally. A wide variety of breath-taking performances and drills make the highlights.

All the major government buildings are beautifully illuminated with lights every evening from 26th to 29th January. On the third day after Republic Day, that is 29th, 'Beating the Retreat' ceremony is conducted consisting of massed bands marching to the popular tunes. The Drummer's Call follows wherein the drummers give solo performances. Thereafter, the Bugle Call follows which is characterized by the band master walking up to the President requesting to take the bands away. This marks the end of the closing ceremony of Republic Day. At 6 pm, the buglers sound the retreat and the National Flag is lowered. With this, the Republic Day celebrations are formally ended.